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In My Mailbox Monday

In May, Mailbox Monday is hosted by Mari at Mari Reads. In My Mailbox is hosted by The Story Siren.  These are the places where we brag about share the books that arrived in our mailboxes each week.  As always, I also try to find a mailbox that is somehow associated with what I’m reading right now.  I’m reading The Devil’s Rooming House by M. William Phelps so I found a Connecticut mailbox.

Here’s what I got this week, all from publishers:

The Honored Dead by Joseph Braude (for a TLC Book Tour).  Joseph Braude is the first Western journalist ever to secure embed status with an Arab security force, assigned to a hardened unit of detectives in Casablanca who handle everything from busting al-Qaeda cells to solving homicides. One day hes given the file for a seemingly commonplace murder: a young guard at a warehouse killed in what appears to be a robbery gone wrong. Braude is intrigued by the details of the case: the sheer brutality of the murder, the identities of the accuseda soldierand the victim, a shadowy migrant with links to a radical cleric, and the odd location: a warehouse owned by a wealthy member of one of the few thriving Jewish communities in the Arab world. After interviewing the victims best friend, who tearfully insists that the true story of the murder has been covered up by powerful interests, Braude commits to getting to the bottom of it.

Braudes risky pursuit of the shocking truth behind the murder takes him from cosmopolitan Marrakesh to the proud Berber heartland, from the homes of the wealthiest and most powerful people in the country to the backstreets of Casablanca, where migrants come to make fortunes, jihad, and trouble, but often end up just trying to survive with dignity. The Honored Dead is a timely and riveting mystery about a society in transition, the power of the truth, and the irrepressible human need for justice.

212 by Alafair Burke (for a TLC Book Tour).  In New York City, Nights Are Dangerous. Days Are Numbered.

When New York University sophomore Megan Gunther finds personal threats posted to a website specializing in campus gossip, she’s taken aback by their menacing tone. Someone knows her daily routine down to the minute and is watching herbut thanks to the anonymity provided by the Internet, the police tell her there’s nothing they can do. Her friends are sure it’s someone’s idea of a joke, but when Megan is murdered in a vicious attack, NYPD Detective Ellie Hatcher is convinced that the online threats are more than just empty words.

With smooth, straight-talking partner J. J. Rogan at her side, Ellie tries to identify Megan’s enemies, but she begins to wonder if the coed’s murder was more than just the culmination of a cyber obsession. And when Megan’s roommate suddenly disappears, Ellie and J. J. know they have to find her before another young woman dies.

Wanderlust:  An Affair with Five Continents by Elisabeth Eaves (for a TLC Book Tour).  Spanning 15 years of travel, beginning when she is a sophomore in college, Wanderlust documents Elisabeth Eavess insatiable hunger for the rush of the unfamiliar and the experience of encountering new people and cultures. Young and independent, she crisscrosses five continents and chases the exotic, both in culture and in romance. In the jungles of Papua New Guinea, she loses herselfliterallyto an Australian tour guide; in Cairo, she reconnects with her high school sweetheart, only to discover the beginning of a pattern that will characterize her life over the long-term: while long-distance relationships work well for her, traditional relationships do not.

Wanderlust, however, is more than a chronological conquest of men and countries: at its core, its a journey of self-discovery. In the course of her travels, Eaves finds herself and the sense of home shes been lacking since childhoodand she sheds light on a growing culture of young women who have the freedom and inclination to define their own, increasingly global, lifestyles, unfettered by traditional roles and conventions of past generations of women.

Happily Ever After edited by John KlimaFor most of us, fairy tales touch some primal chord. This appeal taps that appeal with new and reconstructed fairy tales by major genre writers including Gregory Maguire, Patricia Briggs, Peter Straub, Neil Gaiman, Holly Black, Charles de Lint, Bill Willingham, Susanna Clarke, and many others. A 450-page dip into the deepest core of childhood.

The Case for the Only Child by Susan Newman, Ph.D. (for TLC Book Tour).  Popular Psychology Today blogger and parenting author of fifteen books, including the groundbreaking Parenting the Only Child, Susan Newman, Ph.D., grew impatient with the pervasiveness of only-child folklore masquerading as fact and offers the latest findings about the long-term effects of being raised as a singleton.

In The Case for the Only Child, Newman walks parents (and future parents) through the long list of factors working for and against them as well as highlights the many positive aspects of raising and being a singleton. The aim of this book is to ease and guide parents through the process of determining what they want. Although each situation is unique, the profound confusion surrounding having a second child is similar. It is one of the most difficult and life-altering choices parents face. Adding to one’s family dramatically changes one’s life and the life of one’s firstborn forever. What will a person give up in time, money, freedom, intimacy, and job advancement with another child in the household? What will they gain? The Case for the Only Child helps explore and resolve these perplexing questions. 

Half a Life by Darin Strauss.  Half my life ago, I killed a girl.

So begins Darin Strauss Half a Life, the true story of how one outing in his fathers Oldsmobile resulted in the death of a classmate and the beginning of a different, darker life for the author. We follow Strauss as he explores his startling pastcollision, funeral, the queasy drama of a high-stakes court caseand what starts as a personal tale of a tragic event opens into the story of how to live with a very hard fact: we can try our human best in the crucial moment, and it might not be good enough. Half a Life is a nakedly honest, ultimately hopeful examination of guilt, responsibility, and living with the past. 


Be sure to visit all the other cool mailboxes out there and see what other nummies people got!


Happy Monday!

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